Making magic with crochet | vogue india

Gabrielle Hearst

“In Jamaica, crocheting is a craft that is still passed down from generation to generation, often from grandmothers and mothers to daughters. You see it everywhere – placemats and table runners in people’s homes, bathing suits, blankets and hats” -Rachel Scott, Diotima

“In Jamaica, crocheting is a craft that is still passed down from generation to generation, often from grandmothers and mothers to daughters. You see it everywhere – placemats and table runners in people’s homes, bathing suits, blankets and hats. In the Rasta community, in particular, there is a particular reverence for crocheted hats and belts. Aside from Jamaican craftsmanship, I always think about what fashion is from a Jamaican perspective. A bestseller is what Scott calls the ‘web top’, a traditional Jamaican crocheted starched cotton harness top. Reminiscent of a spider’s web, it is an eminently romantic piece, skillfully subverting the codes of sartorial primacy.

Metallic Crochet Maxi Dress, Christopher Esber, ₹92,125

“The possibilities are endless. You start with just one running strand of yarn and you can do anything with it” —Aneeth Arora

Another, the Marchande skirt, sees the crochet spread like an ethereal cloud down one side. Collaboration and innovation also inform pero, the Delhi-based label founded by Aneeth Arora, who began tinkering with crochet in 2015 and is known for her elegiac storytelling through tactile interpretations of hand-woven textiles from crochet. ‘India. Arora explains that one day while walking around Delhi, she saw a woman with an exceptionally beautiful crocheted dupatta decorated with bird and butterfly designs. Arora was so drawn to it that she started chatting with the woman, which resulted in a long-term collaboration with the Afghan refugee community in Delhi.