ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with VR apps

What if textiles could react to body movements? this is the question that led ganit goldstein to create a embroidery piece as part of his MA at the royal college of art in london. Titled “Rhythm of Matter”, the project explores the role of physical materials in a digital space through a flower-patterned fabric with embedded electronics and virtual reality apps.

images courtesy of ganit goldstein

the young master’s graduate spent three months in eastern switzerland to create a large-format piece of embroidery measuring 2 x 2 meters with on-board electronics, made possible thanks to saurer machines. the collaboration was part of a textile and design alliance residency program, supported by textilmusuem at st. gallen, and launched by the cantons of appenzell ausserrhoden, st.gallen and thurgau.

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

large-scale embroidery design with integrated electronics

goldstein worked closely with the saurer R&D team to produce the large piece of fabric. they worked together with special yarns that can modify the properties of the fabric with a lightweight system integrated into the design. the result is a floral pattern that reacts to hand movements using a virtual reality application designed on top of physical fabric.

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

the fabric reacts to hand movements using a virtual reality application designed on top of the physical fabric.

the VR app reads the movement of the physical hands as the hands approach the physical tissue, where the change appears with interactive movement of the virtual tissues. this system, a day and night cycle, communicates movement, color and sound through physical hand gestures and a light system.

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

VR app reads hand movements as hands approach fabric

the research investigates the boundary between “digital hands” and tangible materials – how the former might extend the reality of the latter. he asks if the haptic experience could be explored differently by the hybrid of presence and distant matter. Goldstein’s research on embedded systems in textile designs will continue to be explored through her SMArchS studies at MIT Architecture beginning in September 2021, while she will work on collaborative research with the Tangible Media Group at MIT Media Lab.

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

rhythm of matter explores the role of physical materials in a digital space

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

an embroidered fabric with glow-in-the-dark capabilities was used

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

over 100 specialty needles and yarns produced the interactive fabric

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

goldstein worked closely with saurer’s R&D team to produce the large piece of fabric

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

the piece on display at a graduation ceremony at the royal college of art in london

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

close-up view of repeating flower shape, designed to allow movement of petals

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

goldstein with the last piece

ganit goldstein creates interactive embroidery piece with designboom VR apps

the large-scale embroidery piece was made in collaboration with saurer machines as part of the TaDA residency

designboom received this project from our ‘DIY Submissions‘, where we invite our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: lynne myers | design boom