Indian traditional and tribal handicrafts fetch $120.06 million in overseas markets – The New Indian Express

NEW DELHI: With the steady increase in demand for traditional and tribal handicrafts, India has become one of the largest handicraft exporting countries. A senior tribal ministry official said tribal handicrafts are in greater demand than ever due to their aesthetics and eco-friendly nature. In May 2022 alone, India’s total handicraft exports reached $120.06 million, an increase of about 1.01% from April 2022 this year.

“In 2021-2022, total exports of Indian handicrafts were valued at $4.35 billion, an increase of 25.7% from the previous year,” a senior official said. Among other handicrafts, Indian shawls, paintings, wooden objects, earthen pots, bags, traditional jewelry, baskets and other handmade wooden items are gaining more and more importance on foreign markets, including the United States. According to official data, the initiative that began to make tribal products global has begun to yield encouraging results not only in overseas markets, but also within the country.

“Inland, the marketing of tribal and traditional handicrafts is done through larger networks of 140 Trifed (Tribal Co-operatives Marketing Development Federation of India) outlets. This initiative has also generated employment for 10.5 lakh artisans over the past 6 years. And notably, half of them (enjoying jobs) are women artisans,” an official said, further adding that handicrafts and looms have established India’s identity on the global markets.

According to the Export Promotion Council for Handicrafts, Traditional Indian Jewellery, Embroidery, Hand Printed Textiles, Wooden Ware, Metal Ware, Agarbati and Attars – produced by traditional and tribal communities of India, have also started gaining demand overseas as well as in the domestic markets. According to available data, India is home to more than 3,000 handicrafts and other forms of traditional handicrafts such as “Paper Mache” from Jammu and Kashmir, “Thangka-paintings” from Ladakh, Madhubani paintings from Bihar, Phulkari and bagh textiles from Punjab, Haryana textiles ‘brassware’ and ‘Zardosi artwork’ from UP.

NEW DELHI: With the steady increase in demand for traditional and tribal handicrafts, India has become one of the largest handicraft exporting countries. A senior tribal ministry official said tribal handicrafts are in greater demand than ever due to their aesthetics and eco-friendly nature. In May 2022 alone, India’s total handicraft exports reached $120.06 million, an increase of about 1.01% from April 2022 this year. “In 2021-2022, total exports of Indian handicrafts were valued at $4.35 billion, an increase of 25.7% from the previous year,” a senior official said. Among other handicrafts, Indian shawls, paintings, wooden objects, earthen pots, bags, traditional jewelry, baskets and other handmade wooden items are gaining more and more importance on foreign markets, including the United States. According to official data, the initiative that began to make tribal products global has begun to yield encouraging results not only in overseas markets, but also within the country. “Inland, the marketing of tribal and traditional handicrafts is done through larger networks of 140 Trifed (Tribal Co-operatives Marketing Development Federation of India) outlets. This initiative has also generated employment for 10.5 lakh artisans over the past 6 years. And notably, half of them (enjoying jobs) are female artisans,” an official stated, further adding that handicrafts and handlooms have established India’s identity on the global markets. According to the Export Promotion Council for Handicrafts, Traditional Indian Jewellery, Embroidery, Hand Printed Textiles, Wooden Ware, Metal Ware, Agarbati and Attars – produced by traditional and tribal communities of India, have also started gaining demand overseas as well as in the domestic markets. According to available data, India is home to more than 3,000 handicrafts and other forms of traditional crafts such as “Paper Mache” from Jammu and Kashmir, “Thangka Paintings” from Ladakh, Madhubani from Bihar, ‘Phulkari and bagh textiles from Punjab, Haryana textiles ‘dinanderie’ and ‘Zardosi artwork’ from UP.